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California Pending Home Sales Continue Annual Increase for Seventh Straight Month

 

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California pending home sales continued to gain steam in June, registering seven months of continued annual increases and the fifth consecutive month of double-digit increases, according to the CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS® (C.A.R.).

In a separate report, California REALTORS responding to C.A.R’s June Market Pulse Survey saw a reduction in floor calls, listing appointments, and open house traffic, compared with May. The Market Pulse Survey is a monthly online survey of more than 300 California REALTORS, Which measures data about their last closed transaction and sentiment about business activity in their market area for the previous month and the last year.

Pending Home Sales data:

• California pending home sales were up 12.5% on an annual basis from the revised 107 index recorded in June 2014, marking the seventh straight month of year-to-year gains and the fifth straight month of double-digit advances.
• Statewide pending home sales fell in June on a month-to-month basis, with the Pending Home Sales index (PHSI) decreasing 2.6% from revised 123.6 in May to 120.4, based on signed contracts. The month-to-month decrease was slightly below the average May-June loss of 1.9% observed in the last seven years.
• A shortage of available homes in the San Francisco Bay Area stified pending sales in June, pushing the PHSI to 127.9, down 5.3% from 135.1 in May down 0.9% from 129.1 index recorded in June 2014.
• Pending home sales in Southern California continued last month’s increase by rising 4% in June to reach an index of 109.6 up 14.2% from June 2014 index of 96.
• Central Valley pending sales fell in June dropping 8.2% from May to reach an index of 99.5 in June but up 14.2% from 87.2 index of June 2014.

Equity and distressed housing market data:

• The share of equity sales – or non-distressed property sales – declined slightly in June to make up 92.4% of all home sales, remaining near the highest level since late 2007. Equity sales make up 92.6% of all home sales in May and 89.9% in June 2014. The share of equity sales has been at or near 90% since mid-2014.
• Conversely, the combined share of all distressed property sales (REOs and short sales) rose slightly in June, up to 7.6% from 7.4% in May. Distressed sales made up 10.1% of total sales a year ago. Ten of the 43 counties that C.A.R. reported showed month-to-month decreases in their distressed sales shares, with Alameda and Santa Clara having the smallest share of distressed sales shares at 1%, followed by San Mateo (2%), Contra Costa (3%), and San Francisco (3%). Glenn had the highest share of distressed sales at 27% followed by Merced and Siskiyou (both at 23%) For more information, visit http://www.car.org, CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS®

The Road to Recovery: 4 Factors That Affect Home Prices

 

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Posted on May 11 2015 – 3:56pm by Suzanne De Vita
With housing on a steady path to recovery, home prices have risen approximately 20 percent in the last three years, according to the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) and Standard & Poor’s (S&P) Case-Shiller house price indices – and both consumers and industry professionals expect that upward trajectory to continue this year.

The anticipated increase is the result of intersecting economic indicators – macro-level factors painting the big picture that is today’s housing market.

So what’s impacting prices these days?

Wages and Inflation – As much as the economy’s improved, a recent RealtyTrac analysis illustrates disconnect between house price growth and wage growth. Between 2012 and 2014, home prices increased by 17 percent; wages, in contrast, increased 1.3 percent – a 13 to 1 disparity. Furthermore, home prices continue to outpace inflation rates, growing twice as fast in 2014, according to S&P.

But inflation rates as they stand likely affect home prices indirectly, argues renowned economist and Nobel Laureate Robert Shiller. Because pay increases often boost perceptions of buying power, inflation may have a greater impact on consumer confidence, which, in turn, could ignite housing activity.

Interest Rates and Inventory – Inflation rates, however, do tend to influence interest rates. While it’s reasonable to assume rising mortgage interest rates equal falling house prices, in truth, there’s little evidence of a causal relationship between the two. In fact, higher mortgage rates have a tendency to predicate a decrease in purchases, rather than a dip in prices, concludes Mark Palim, Fannie Mae Vice President, Economic & Strategic Research Group.

That said, interest rates do play a role in overall affordability. In many markets, today’s rates have significantly propelled demand.

“The biggest factor in price gains has been the current low interest rates spurring demand,” says Gabe Sanders of BlueWater Real Estate in Stuart, Fla. “And our low inventory, which makes buyers willing to spend more, since they can’t find enough available lower-priced properties.”

In Sanders’ market, prices on the lower end have risen much more than those of mid-range homes, with the largest gains seen under $400,000 in Martin County and under $200,000 to $250,000 in St. Lucie County. This demonstrates what many nationwide are experiencing – escalating prices, due to a shortage of affordable listings, have adversely tipped the scale, especially for first-time homebuyers.

To counter the lack of inventory and rise in prices, new construction gains are essential, says Lawrence Yun, chief economist for the National Association of REALTORS®. Post-crash, single-family construction has been slow to pick up steam, primarily because of construction costs that fail to meet buyer expectations.

Demographics – In addition, generational shifts have historically affected demand and moved prices in the housing market. Currently making waves are baby boomers and millennials, though many of the latter have been priced out due to statistically lower incomes and sluggish wage growth. And like toppling dominos, too few first-timers bodes ill for move-up buyers or those seeking to relocate.

International interest can also drive home prices, particularly in luxury markets. In Beverly Hills, Calif., global demand, coupled with the area’s high-end status and pleasant climate, impacts prices considerably, says Endre Barath, Jr. of Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices California Properties.

“Prices in the 90210 zip code are trending upward and are getting close to an all-time high,” Barath says. “Looking at the current rate of sales versus the current inventory, we are still in a seller’s market, but getting close to a balanced market.”

Oil Prices – Another distinct market trend could also affect home prices in the near future. Following the decline in oil prices, markets with oil economies, such as Texas, Louisiana and Oklahoma, may see home prices drop at the end of this year and into 2016, Trulia reports. Conversely, non-oil-producing markets, particularly in the Northeast and Midwest, may see a boost in prices. These findings mirror oil and home price fluctuations since the 1980s.

While there are many more variables factoring into the equation, house prices remain subject to these predominant large-scale influencers. I put it to our readers – where do you think prices are headed?

We thought this article was a good one and would like your thoughts in where do you think prices are headed? And if you would like our thoughts contact us we would be happy to discuss this with you.

Housing Data Shows Surge in Demand, Median List Prices

 

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By Brian Honea

On April 8, 2015 @ 7:59 am In Daily Dose,Featured,Market Studies,News
An early look at the realtor.com national monthly housing data, which is based on the first three weeks of March, showed that housing demand is surging and median list prices are rising faster.
The median age of inventory declined by 13 percent month-over-month in March despite a 2 percent increase in inventory for that same period, according to realtor.com. Meanwhile, the median list price for a home rose nationally by 3 percent month-over-month and 11 percent year-over-year up to $220,000 for March.
“It’s still a seller’s market,” said Jonathan Smoke, realtor.com chief economist. “Realtor.com data shows that supply is not keeping pace with surging demand. We expect rising prices to persuade those who may be on the fence about listing their homes to do so in the coming months, leading to closer parity between supply and demand.”
The realtor.com data concurred with Fannie Mae’s March 2015 Housing Survey [3] , which also showed signs of a seller’s market. The percentage of respondents in Fannie Mae’s survey who said they believe now is a good time to sell reached an all-time survey high of 46 percent while the percentage of people surveyed who said now is a good time to buy declined slightly to 20 percent, possibly indicating a move toward a more balanced housing market.
Smoke determined the 20 hottest housing markets in the nation based on the number of listing views relative to the number of listings when looking at March data and website traffic. Realtor.com said these markets should see plenty of activity in the next few months as homebuying season gets underway. The top 20 markets were: 1. Waco, Texas; 2. New Orleans-Metairie, Louisiana; 3. Ann Arbor, Michigan; 4. Denver-Aurora-Lakewood, Colorado; 5. Santa Rosa, California; 6. Fort Wayne, Indiana; 7. Vallejo-Fairfield, California; 8. San Diego-Carlsbad, California; 9. Columbus, Ohio; 10. Detroit-Warren-Dearborn, Michigan; 11. Manchester-Nashua, New Hampshire; 12. Boston-Cambridge-Newton, Massachusetts-New Hampshire; 13. Austin-Round Rock, Texas; 14. Boulder, Colorado; 15. Springfield, Illinois; 16. Charleston, West Virginia; 17. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; 18. Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida; 19. College Station-Bryan, Texas; and 20. Lansing-East Lansing, Michigan.

Staging for Winter Home Sales

 

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Selling in the winter offers at least two positives – less competition and new customers. During the winter, most people have taken their listings off the market, but agents can help buyers who have been forced into sudden moves, like executives with job transfers who are looking to purchase a property quickly.

To take advantage of the season, make sure your home is properly staged for the winter. This can help your property receive a higher offer and get off the market sooner.
Start on the Outside

There is no question that curb appeal is one of the first things that attract a potential buyer, but more often than not, they are forgiving of a snow-covered property during the winter months. Most buyers understand that snow piles up in the yard and trees stay barren during cold weather.

What they will not tolerate however is the inability to get to your open house because of bad weather. If heavy snow threatens before the open house, you may need to provide alternative directions to visitors or move the showing to when the weather is more favorable.

If snow covers the ground, clear a safe path from the street to the front door. Spreading sand or salt on the walkway can improve footing. Do not forget to also clear a pathway to any outdoor areas that you want buyers to visit, such as a storage shed or guest house.
Make it Comfortable

Be sure to ask your client to turn on the heat in all the rooms for a warm walk-through. Before the open house begins, walk through the property and check the warmth level in each room. If any room or area feels chilly, buyers may assume that the home lacks adequate insulation or has heating issues.

If the source of the cold air is a draft from a hole or a poorly sealed window, seal any gaps to eliminate the problem. Poor air circulation may also be an issue. You can remedy this by moving furniture away from vents wherever the room allows.
Show Warmth

What buyers see can affect their perception of warmth. Barren areas, solid colors, shine and reflective surfaces reinforce a “cool” aesthetic and are best reserved for summer staging. In the winter, ensure that warm fabrics, rugs, pillows, curtains, bed linens and tablecloths adorn the home for visual warmth. Layer throws and pillows on sofas and beds so visitors can envision cozy days spent on the couch. Use richly textured materials such as furry blankets and wooden accessories.

Bring in the promise of warmer times by putting containers filled with winter-blooming plants in strategic locations. Place a hanging plant near the entry, a winter bouquet on the dining room table or a bunch of small flowers on the side tables flanking the couch.

Staging your winter listings should not take any more time, effort or money than in the summer. Adequate preparation and a bit of attention to detail can make the difference between marketing a cozy home that buyers will bid on and a property that languishes on the market for months because it seems as cold as the weather outside.

 

Will Shrinking Inventories Price Out New Buyers in California?

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Posted by RE-Insider on 2/09/15 • Categorized as Industry News

While many aspects of the real estate market have seen encouraging changes in recent weeks, one new development could spell disaster in the near future. Recently, the total number of homes available nationwide fell for the first time in 16 months, while many Californian markets saw significant drops from previous months. Now, there is a growing concern that the tightening inventory could accelerate price gains – a change which could ultimately force many would-be buyers out of the market.

A new report from the National Association of Realtors recently stated that the number of homes available on the market dropped in the month of December, waning by a modest 1% from the year before but marking the first year over year decline in 16 months.

Although several metro areas throughout California saw improvements year-over-year, many still saw significant drops in inventory from previous months.

Orange County for example – which is already facing a housing shortage and believed to have a deficit of 30,000 to 60,000 homes – had a significant improvement of 43.9% year-over-year but still dropped 8.5% from the month before. San Francisco’s inventory, on the other hand, declined by 15% year-over-year and 40% from the month before. San Diego saw a more modest drop, with inventory sinking by 1.7% from the year before and 16.9% from the previous month.

Bakersfield was the only metro area which saw positive gains on both a yearly and monthly basis, increasing by a whopping 52.1% and 4.1% respectively, according to data collected by Redfin.

While sellers may at potentially increasing prices, it’s likely that buyers and their agents will start to feel the pressure of a tightening inventory.

“Months’ supply is already low at 4.4 months,” said National Association of Realtors Chief Economist Lawrence Yun in an analysis of the trend. “More inventories are needed, not less. Or else, home prices could reaccelerate.”

It’s believed that a part of the drop was a result of declining foreclosure inventories, so agents and brokers who deal heavily in distressed properties should be aware that business opportunities could be shrinking as well.

Do you think the recent drop in available listings will price out new buyers? What are your thoughts?

Bank Economists Predict Robust Economic Growth in 2015

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by RISMedia

2015 will show an economic improvement, according to the Economic Advisory, Committee of the American Bankers Association, who predicts that the U.S. economy will grow nearly 3 percent on an inflation-adjusted basis this year compared to 2.5 percent last year.

The committee, which includes 15 chief economists from among the largest banks in North America, sees an improved fundamental backdrop for growth. Sectors that were severely damaged during the 2008-2009 crisis better health. Household balance sheets have also improved, with strong gains in asset prices and a dramatic drop in debt service burden.

The fiscal and monetary policy environment is supportive of growth. Fiscal policy is no longer a headwind as budget brinkmanship battles abate and tax and spending polices stabilize. The group forecasts the federal budget deficit will stabilize at $470 billion in fiscal year 2015.

The committee expects the Federal Reserve to maintain near-zero interest rates through mid-2015. Thereafter, the bank economists see a very gradual normalization of interest rates over the next several years.

“We expect the Fed to calibrate its policy to minimize any shock to growth,” says Ethan Harris, chairman of the group and co-head of global economics research at Bank of America Merrill Lynch.

The group sees failing energy prices as a net positive for the economy. Low prices will hurt the oil patch, cutting into mining employment and capital spending. However, this will likely be more than offset by the boost of energy consumers.

“Gas at about $2 a gallon is like an across-the-board tax cut,” says Harris. “Cash savings at the pump leave more money for consumers to save or spend elsewhere.”

Despite the weakness in energy sector investment, the group sees business investment as a strong point for the economy. The consensus forecast is that business investment will rise 5 percent on an inflation-adjusted basis this year.

The Committee sees continued monthly job gains of 200,000 or higher through this year. However, the bank economists expressed concerns that job gains had not yet triggered healthy wage growth.

“Top earners have fared well since the last recession, but the same can’t be says for middle and lower-income families,” says Harris. “Wages have barely kept up with inflation over the last six years, straining household budgets.”

Nonetheless, the Committee believes the ongoing drop in unemployment will start pushing wage growth higher.

“Solid job growth, improving wages and lower energy costs should encourage more families to spend,” says Harris. The Committee expects 3 percent real consumption growth in 2015.

The group expects residential investment to be stronger this year with gains in single and multi-family starts and home sales. The EAC expects home prices nationally to rise 3.5 percent this year.

“With home prices on the rise, families are once again viewing homes as good investments,” says Harris. “Even if mortgage interest rates rise some this year, more people are going to want to buy a first or larger home.”

The group’s consensus is that mortgage rates will rise only from about 4 percent now to 4.5 percent by year-end.

The group forecasts that consumer credit growth will be modest this year and business lending growth will be stronger, but will return to a more normal pace of growth. In 2015 and 2016, loans to individuals are expected to grow about 6 percent and loans to businesses will grow about 10 percent.

“We’re optimistic that business lending will grow at a double-digit rate this year to finance healthy business investment, “says Harris. “Stronger growth in business lending will be critical for the economy. Banks are ready to meet demand as businesses take the next step forward.”

The Committee sees low inflation resulting from failing energy prices, which will temporarily push year-over-year headline inflation into negative territory.

“Outside of energy, the improving domestic economy could put upward pressure on prices, but the weak global backdrop and a strong dollar should limit any inflation acceleration,” says Harris.

The Committee believes the greatest near-term risks to the U.S. economy come from outside the country.

“Disappointing growth in Europe, China and Japan is a reminder that the global economy still faces major challenges, “says Harris.

The Committee also sees major long-run budget challenges.

“As the baby boom generation retires, the federal budget deficit will balloon again, posing a major challenge to future generations, “says Harris.

Nonetheless, the Committee sees a generally positive U.S. economic outlook for 2015 with above-trend growth, low inflation and a go-slow Fed.

Thought that is was a good article so wanted to post it for our readers. Let us know what your thoughts are on this positive growth! Contact us if you would be interested in getting an home evaluation or speaking to us about purchasing a home.

U.S. House Prices Contribute to Global House Price Recovery

by Michael Neal

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A precious blog post illustrated that U.S house prices are recording a range of annual gains with some areas of the country rising faster than others. Similarly, in the context of the global economy, annual house price growth in the U.S. has been faster than some countries while lagging in other countries.

The International Monetary Fund’s Global Housing Watch calculates a real seasonally adjusted house price index for 52 countries including the United States. House prices in these countries are used to calculate two separate global house price indexes. One global house price index assigns an equal weight to each country and the second global house price index is adjusted to account for the size of each country’s economic output (GDP).

Figure 1 below shows that the rate of growth recorded in the US places it in the 2nd quintile amongst countries for which house price data are available. According to the International Monetary Fund, real and seasonally adjusted annual house price growth in the U.S. was estimated to be 3.6% between the second quarter of 2013 and the second quarter of 2014, thereby contributing to the 1.3% increase in real seasonally adjusted global house prices. The IMF comparison utilizes the Federal Housing Agency (FHFA) house price index.

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Earlier blog posts have illustrated how typically, house prices in areas that fell the most remain farther from their peak level.
Similarly, in an international comparison, real seasonally adjusted house prices in the U.S. fell more than collective would house prices, but they are farther from returning to their peak level. As Figure 2 illustrates, house prices in the U.S reached their peak in the fourth quarter of 2006 and fell to 73% of that peak by the second quarter of 2011. As of the second quarter of 2014, U.S. house prices peaked in the first quarter of 2008 and fell to 91% of that level in the second quarter of 2009. However, as of the second quarter of 2014, global house prices are at 94% of their peak level.
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by Michael Neal

global_housing_concept

A precious blog post illustrated that U.S house prices are recording a range of annual gains with some areas of the country rising faster than others. Similarly, in the context of the global economy, annual house price growth in the U.S. has been faster than some countries while lagging in other countries.

The International Monetary Fund’s Global Housing Watch calculates a real seasonally adjusted house price index for 52 countries including the United States. House prices in these countries are used to calculate two separate global house price indexes. One global house price index assigns an equal weight to each country and the second global house price index is adjusted to account for the size of each country’s economic output (GDP).

Figure 1 below shows that the rate of growth recorded in the US places it in the 2nd quintile amongst countries for which house price data are available. According to the International Monetary Fund, real and seasonally adjusted annual house price growth in the U.S. was estimated to be 3.6% between the second quarter of 2013 and the second quarter of 2014, thereby contributing to the 1.3% increase in real seasonally adjusted global house prices. The IMF comparison utilizes the Federal Housing Agency (FHFA) house price index.

house_prices_graph_1

Earlier blog posts have illustrated how typically, house prices in areas that fell the most remain farther from their peak level.
Similarly, in an international comparison, real seasonally adjusted house prices in the U.S. fell more than collective would house prices, but they are farther from returning to their peak level. As Figure 2 illustrates, house prices in the U.S reached their peak in the fourth quarter of 2006 and fell to 73% of that peak by the second quarter of 2011. As of the second quarter of 2014, U.S. house prices peaked in the first quarter of 2008 and fell to 91% of that level in the second quarter of 2009. However, as of the second quarter of 2014, global house prices are at 94% of their peak level.
house_price_performance_graph_2

Should I Sell My Home Now or Wait Until the Spring?

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There are many questions homeowners ask themselves during the selling process. “How much will my home sell for?”  “How much should I list my home for?”  “Who should I select as a real estate agent to sell my home?”  “What if the real estate agent overprices my home?”  Last but not least, “Is this a good time to be selling a home?” is also a very common question that real estate agents are asked.

As with every decision in life, there are pros and cons, and choosing when to sell a home is no different. There are many factors that need to be taken into consideration before deciding when to sell a home. Many homeowners believe selling a home during the fall or winter months is not a good idea and that the spring is the only time a house should be sold. This is the furthest from the truth. Certainly most real estate markets across the United States experience a “spring market rush” every year. There is no doubt that the “spring market” is a great time to be selling and buying real estate, however, the fall and winter seasons may be the best fit for you for many reasons.

Here are several reasons why choosing to sell your home now may be a better decision than waiting until the spring:

Less Competition
One way that you can tell the spring real estate market has arrived is by driving down a street in your local community. In all likelihood there will be For Sale signs up all over the neighborhood! One great reason to sell your home now and not wait until the spring market is there is sure to be less competition.  The fewer number of comparable homes for sale, the greater the probability that a buyer will look at your home.

Simply put, it’s the supply and demand theory. If there are less homes for sale, there are less homes that a potential buyer can choose from, therefore increasing the demand for your home. Not only will less competition increase the probability for showings, but it will also increase the probability that an offer will be received and you will get the maximum amount of money for your home.

Serious Buyers Are Out There
Homes are sold and bought 365 days a year, period!  Many homeowners believe that buyers aren’t out there during the fall and winter months. This simply is not the case. Serious buyers are always out there!  Some buyers may stop their home search because it is the fall or winter, but serious buyers will continue to look at homes, no matter what time of year it is.

The fall and winter months are also a great time for a potential buyer to see what a specific neighborhood is like.  Do your neighbors have pumpkins on their front step?  Are there lots of Trick-or-Treaters wandering the neighborhood on Halloween?  Do any of your neighbors have any light displays for the holidays?  There are buyers out there who will look at these types of things when determining whether your home is in the right neighborhood for them or not.

The Best Agents Are Always Up To The Challenge
Any real estate agent who tells you that the fall or winter months are a bad time to sell is not someone you want selling your home! A great real estate agent will know how to adapt to the current season and market their listings to reflect that.  A great real estate agent can make suggestions and give some of their tips on hot to sell a home during the fall or winter seasons. If a real estate agent doesn’t have any suggestions on making your home more desirable for the current season, you should be concerned about the creativity they are going to use when marketing your home.

Staging For The Holiday Season
Many sellers believe staging a home is the main reason a home sells.  While staging certainly helps sell homes, some buyers have a difficult time envisioning themselves in a home no matter what you do. However, there are some buyers who can easily be “sold” on a home because it is staged.  Simple “seasonal” staging such as adjusting the color of the decor or having an aroma in the air that is relative to the time of year can go a long way with some potential buyers and possibly be the difference between a home selling or not.

Mortgage Rates Are Low
If you’ve read about real estate in the past year, it’s likely you’ve read that the mortgage rates are very low.  You also probably read that there is an expectation that the rates will increase very soon. Since mortgage rates are so low right now, buyers are able to afford more expensive homes.  If mortgage rates increase over the fall and winter months while you’re waiting for the spring market, it could cost you thousands of dollars as it could eliminate many buyers from the real estate marketplace!  Less demand for your home will mean less money. Bottom line: take advantage of selling your home while the rates are this low.

Quicker Transactions
Right now, there are fewer real estate transactions than there will be in the spring.  The fewer number of transactions means the mortgage lenders have less loans to process, attorneys have less closings to do, and home inspectors have fewer inspections to do.  All of these factors should lead to a quicker transaction and closing for all the parties involved.  One of the most frustrating things for a seller to deal with while selling their home is not getting answers in a reasonable amount of time. A quicker transaction is going to be less stress for you.

By considering all of the reasons above, you will be able to determine whether now is a good time to sell or if you should wait until the spring.

Article written by Kyle Hiscock and posted by RISMedia’s housecall.  We wanted to post this article due to it has some really great points about selling your home in the Fall and wanted our readers to take note of some of them!

Don’t Wait! Move Up to the Home You Always Wanted

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Now that the housing market has stabilized, more and more homeowners are considering moving up to the home they have always dreamed of. Prices are still below those of a few years ago and interest rates are still below 5%.

However, sellers should realize that waiting to make the move while mortgage rates are increasing probably doesn’t make sense. As rates increase, the price of the house you can buy will decrease.

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This is the projected rates, so for sure this is the time to make your move!

We would be happy to help you to Find the right New Home, Condo, Vacation Home or Condo!  Just give us a call today!

5 Questions You Should Ask Your Real Estate Agent

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Whether you are buying or selling a home, the process can be challenging. That is why we always suggest that you take on the services of a real estate professional when embarking on a potential home move. However, not all real estate agents are the same. A family must make sure they hire someone who truly understands the current housing market and, not only that, knows how to connect the dots to explain how market conditions may impact your decision.

How can you make sure you have an agent who meets these requirements?

Here are just a few questions every real estate professional should be able to answer for their clients and customers:

  • Are home values approaching a new bubble or will prices continue to appreciate?
  • Is it better for a first time buyer or a move-up buyer to wait until they save a bigger down payment before they purchase a home?
  • Where will 30-year mortgage rates likely be in 12 months?
  • Why do I need an agent when I can just as easily find the house online myself?
  • Is buying a home still a good investment for my family?

Make sure you hire an agent that can answer questions like those above. That will guarantee the home buying or selling process will be much easier for you and your family.

YES! We are ready to answer all of your questions!  Let us know what those questions are!